One year on in Nepal: Play for Change (PFC) has enabled the Power of Sport to have direct impact within a globally disadvantaged community.

The PFC flagship programme called 'Khelaun Khelaun' has brought positive change to communities in the Lamjung District in Nepal, which is a country facing multi-dimensional poverty[1]  and severely devastated by the 2015 earthquakes. Lamjung has an existing lack of infrastructure for sport and the aim of the programme is to embed a culture of sport to help reduce some of the inequalities that lie in the community.

The PFC programme, delivered with its local and global partners, aims to effectively improve the infrastructure by implementing badminton and volleyball sessions, providing sport equipment, improving and building playgrounds and sport facilities, delivering life skills workshops on relevant social issues, whilst creating employment opportunities and providing official coaching qualifications.

This year in Lamjung, which has a population of over 100,000 people, the community led female empowerment programme has begun. This has the aim of helping to embed gender equality throughout the community, which is especially important because women, as half the population in Nepal, are statistically the most disadvantaged group. This element of the programme has been made possible by funds raised from the TV Sports Awards 2016 (more information is available here).   

Local workforce starting to install the community gyms

Local workforce starting to install the community gyms

PFC, working closely with the local community to build capacity, has employed a local work force to start installing community gyms and equipment for more people to have safer access to sport. Many of the schools’ playgrounds have now been rebuilt or improved to help encourage more people to participate in sport. For those facing multi-dimensional poverty, improving health and well being is important [1]

Balloon Play:  FIVB-trained coaches are training the teachers to deliver the sport sessions. 

Balloon Play:  FIVB-trained coaches are training the teachers to deliver the sport sessions. 

Not only working hand in hand with its local partners, but PFC also works closely with its global partners to ensure the programmes are of a high quality.  PFC's collaboration with FIVB (Federation Internationale Volleyball) and BWF (Badminton World Federation) has enabled many of the teachers in the schools to now have the skills to deliver effective training to the children (previously mentioned here). This enables a professional culture of sports training for children, which is a key component of PFC's aim of delivering high quality programmes.

Derelict and uneven: the land before the pitches were built

Derelict and uneven: the land before the pitches were built

In a landlocked and mountainous country, the communities can experience high levels of isolation, however one year into the programme and  5,993 children have benefited from meaningful participation in the sports league and 49 staff have been up-skilled.

By making sport more accessible, PFC has begun to tackle the inequalities that lie in education, employment, health and geographical logistics that act as a barrier to human development[2]. The programme has 2 years left to continue and PFC look forward to seeing the infrastructure grow.

New safe spaces for children

New safe spaces for children

[1] MPI Country Briefings 2016, Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative OPHI):http://www.dataforall.org/dashboard/ophi/index.php/mpi/country_briefings 

[2] Human Development Reports, United Nations Development Programme: http://hdr.undp.org/en/countries/profiles/NPL

 

The Khelaun Khelaun programme is delivered in partnership with Global Action Nepal, with funding from UEFA Foundation for Children, and with the support of the Badminton World Federation and Federation Internationale de Volleyball.